• Home
    This giant statue illustrates the desire of Renaissance artists to imitate living nature. In the lower part of the colossus is a grotto, with steps leading up to the chamber in the upper part of the body and the head. The statue seems to have a mysterious power that suggests the presence of a spirit.
  • Home
    Birthplace of the artist Raphael, Urbino was one of the most important humanist centers of the Renaissance. Here, Castilgione wrote his famous book, The Courtier. The Palazzo houses the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche, one of the most important collections of Renaissance paintings in the world.
  • Home
    Giusti Gardens, Verona – A Renaissance garden was nature brought to its height of perfection by the artist’s touch.
  • Home
    One of Four Prisoners, by Michelangelo: Michelangelo felt that the body is a reflection of divine beauty, but he also wanted to show the inner self and its struggle.
  • Home
    Certosa of Pavia – Renaissance architects employed ideals of symmetry and geometrical order, so that entering a building designed according to harmonious proportions could evoke a feeling of connection to a greater reality.
  • Home
    Allegory on Water: Venus, ancient goddess of peace, love, and beauty, became a popular subject for artists during the Renaissance. Worldly beauty was said to be a reflection of divine beauty.]
  • Home
    The River Arno and the Bridges of Florence: Florentine humanists studied ancient texts, seeking a common thread. They called theirs a “golden age”, a time when the liberal arts: poetry, writing, sculpture, architecture, music, again came to be respected.
  • Home
    Scala dei Giganti, by Jacopo Sansovino: During the Renaissance, images of ancient divinities figured prominently in both private and public spaces. Here, Mars and Neptune symbolize Venice’s dominion over land and sea.

JDcover sm

Outer Beauty, Inner Joy is in itself a work of art – a brilliant interweaving of quotes and original text, art and architecture, and some of the most beautiful photography of Italy’s treasures that I have ever seen.

– Roy Doliner, co-author, The Sistine Secrets: Michelangelo’s Hidden Messages in the Heart of the Vatican

A beautiful, exhilarating book that integrates the inspiration of Renaissance art with its philosophy.

– Richard Smoley, author, The Dice Game of Shiva and Inner Christianity

Read More

Julianne DavidowJulianne Davidow is a writer, teacher, and certified coach. She is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Julianne has an enduring fascination with the Italian Renaissance. She began spending time in Italy in 1990 and has lived in both Rome and Venice. Her work has been published in literary journals, and print and online magazines. Her first book: Outer Beauty, Inner Joy: Contemplating the Soul of the Renaissance (foreword by Thomas Moore) was published in November 2010 by Bunker Hill Publishing.

Read More

Upcoming and Past Events

There are no upcoming events at this time.

To book Julianne Davidow for an event or book signing, please contact her here.

PAST EVENTS HERE

Please Like Us On Facebook